GRID 3.1 for VMWare VSphere Release Notes

Answer ID 4138
Published 05/24/2016 10:49 AM
Updated 06/28/2016 09:58 AM

GRID 3.1 for VMWare VSphere Release Notes

Version 361.45 / 362.56


VM running older NVIDIA vGPU drivers fails to initialize vGPU when booted

Description

A VM running older NVIDIA drivers, such as those from a previous vGPU release, will fail to initialize vGPU when booted on a vSphere platform running the current release of GRID Virtual GPU Manager.

In this scenario, the VM boots in standard VGA mode with reduced resolution and color depth. The NVIDIA GRID GPU is present in Windows Device Manager but displays a warning sign, and a device status of “Windows has stopped this device because it has reported problems. (Code 43)”.

The VM’s log file reports one of the following errors:

„ A version mismatch between guest and host drivers:

vthread-10| E105: vmiop_log: Guest VGX version(2.0) and Host VGX version(2.1) do not match

„ A signature mismatch:

vthread-10| E105: vmiop_log: VGPU message signature mismatch.

Resolution

Install the latest NVIDIA vGPU release drivers in the VM.

Virtual GPU fails to start if ECC is enabled

Description

GRID K2, Tesla M60, and Tesla M6 support ECC (error correcting code) for improved data integrity. If ECC is enabled, virtual GPU fails to start. The following error is logged in the VM’s log file:

vthread10|E105: Initialization: VGX not supported with ECC Enabled.

Virtual GPU is not currently supported with ECC active. GRID K2 cards and Tesla M60, M6 cards in graphics mode ship with ECC disabled by default, but ECC may subsequently be enabled using nvidia-smi.

Resolution

Use nvidia-smi to list the status of all GPUs, and check for ECC noted as enabled on GPUs.  Change the ECC status to off on a specific GPU by executing the following command:

nvidia-smi -i id -e 0

id is the index of the GPU as reported by nvidia-smi.

Single vGPU benchmark scores are lower than passthrough GPU

Description

A single vGPU configured on a physical GPU produces lower benchmark scores than the physical GPU run in passthrough mode.

Aside from performance differences that may be attributed to a vGPU’s smaller framebuffer size, vGPU incorporates a performance balancing feature known as Frame Rate Limiter (FRL), which is enabled on all vGPUs. FRL is used to ensure balanced performance across multiple vGPUs that are resident on the same physical GPU. The FRL setting is designed to give good interactive remote graphics experience but may reduce scores in benchmarks that depend on measuring frame rendering rates, as compared to the same benchmarks running on a passthrough GPU.

Resolution

FRL is controlled by an internal vGPU setting. NVIDIA does not validate vGPU with FRL disabled, but for validation of benchmark performance, FRL can be temporarily disabled by adding the configuration parameter pciPassthru0.cfg.frame_rate_limiter in the VM’s advanced configuration options (select Edit Settings, select the VM Options tab, expand the Advanced dropdown, select Edit Configuration, select Add Row, then manually enter the parameter name and set it to 0.  (This setting can only be changed when the VM is powered off.)

Image

With this setting in place, the VM’s vGPU will run without any frame rate limit. The FRL can be reverted back to its default setting by setting pciPassthru0.cfg.frame_rate_limiter to 1 or by removing the parameter from the advanced settings.

VMs configured with large memory fail to initialize vGPU when booted

Description

When starting multiple VMs configured with large amounts of RAM (typically more than 32GB per VM), a VM may fail to initialize vGPU. In this scenario, the VM boots in VMware SVGA mode and doesn’t load the NVIDIA driver. The NVIDIA GRID GPU is present in Windows Device Manager but displays a warning sign, and a device status of “Windows has stopped this device because it has reported problems. (Code 43)”.

The VM’s log file contains these error messages:

vthread10|E105: NVOS status 0x29
vthread10|E105: Assertion Failed at 0x7620fd4b:179
vthread10|E105: 8 frames returned by backtrace
...
vthread10|E105: VGPU message 12 failed, result code: 0x29
...
vthread10|E105: NVOS status 0x8
vthread10|E105: Assertion Failed at 0x7620c8df:280
vthread10|E105: 8 frames returned by backtrace
...

vthread10|E105: VGPU message 26 failed, result code: 0x8

Resolution

vGPU reserves a portion of the VM’s framebuffer for use in GPU mapping of VM system memory. The reservation is sufficient to support up to 32GB of system memory, and may be increased to accommodate up to 64GB by adding the configuration parameter pciPassthru0.cfg.enable_large_sys_mem in the VM’s advanced configuration options (select Edit Settings, select the VM Options tab, expand the Advanced dropdown, select Edit Configuration, select Add Row, then manually enter the parameter name and set it to 1. (This setting can only be changed when the VM is powered off.)

With this setting in place, less GPU framebuffer is available to applications running in the VM. To accommodate system memory larger than 64GB, the reservation can be further increased by adding pciPassthru0.cfg.extra_fb_reservation in the VM’s advanced configuration options, and setting its value to the desired reservation size in megabytes. The default value of 64M is sufficient to support 64GB of RAM. We recommend adding 2M of reservation for each additional 1GB of system memory. For example, to support 96GB of RAM, set pciPassthru0.cfg.extra_fb_reservation to 128.

The reservation can be reverted back to its default setting by setting pciPassthru0.cfg.enable_large_sys_mem to 0, or by removing the parameter from the advanced settings.

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